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World War One At Home – the final local stories from a global conflict to be broadcast on BBC local radio stations from Saturday June 25

BBC local radio stations across England and the Channel Islands will launch the final collection of stories from the landmark project World War One at Home, run in partnership with Imperial War Museums.

Over the past two years around 1400 powerful stories about people and places on the home front of Britain and Ireland during World War One have been broadcast

Broadcast Equipment, Receiver Model 556, British © IWM (COM 238)
Broadcast Equipment, Receiver Model 556, British © IWM (COM 238)

and all are linked to specific places across the country. The final stories will be broadcast from Saturday June 25th.

The project has uncovered surprising stories about familiar neighbourhoods where soldiers trained, the wounded were treated, women worked in factories, crucial front line supplies were produced, major scientific breakthroughs were made,  prisoners of war were held and where heroes and heroines are buried.

David Holdsworth, Controller of BBC English Regions, said: “World War One at Home has been an enormously ambitious project that has really engaged our audiences on BBC Local radio over the last two years. These final broadcasts will put the spotlight on people and places around the country that had a significant role to play during the conflict. And the dedicated BBC website that features all of the stories will provide a valuable digital legacy for years to come.”

Diane Lees, Director-General of IWM, said: “The World War One at Home project has inspired countless people across the UK to engage with and uncover stories about the impact of the First World War from their own communities. It has been a fantastic partnership project between the BBC and IWM and one that has shed further light on those who lived, died and survived during the First World War and the way in which we want to remember them now.”

BBC Sussex and Surrey

In Sussex, the coastal town of Peacehaven owes its creation to the events of the First World War. With many men from the local area signing up to join the War effort, a local businessman called Charles Neville devised a plan to create a garden city by the sea where people including ex-servicemen would be able to purchase plots of land upon which they could build homes and a new life.

HMS SUSSEX, 9,850 TONS LONDON CLASS CRUISER.
HMS SUSSEX, 9,850 TONS LONDON CLASS CRUISER. (Courtesy of IWM) © IWM (A 17512)

Actor Brian Capron tells the intriguing story of the only town in the UK to be named after peace and how the evolution of Peacehaven was far more complicated than Mr Neville had anticipated.

BBC London

In September 1914 a secret propaganda bureau was set up at Wellington House in London. The bureau was run by writer Charles Masterman and was said to be so secret that most MPs were unaware it existed.

Courtesy of IWM © IWM (Art.IWM PST 13212)
Soldiers & Sailros Map of London 1916 Courtesy of IWM © IWM (Art.IWM PST 13212)

The bureau called upon writers and newspaper editors to put together material which showed Britain’s war effort in a good light and to counter enemy messages.  Wellington House also printed its own material including newspapers, cartoons and books which were circulated around the world to influence neutral and enemy countries.

BBC Radio Bristol

Downend in Bristol is the home to one of only two Boy Scout War Memorials on public land in the country. It was erected in 1921 in memory of members of the 1st Downend Scout Troop who lost their lives in the Great War of 1914-18.

DO YOU WANT A FERN-BASKET LIKE THIS? Join the Sixth AND COME AND GET ONE. Head-Quarters - St. Michael's Hill, Bristol. Courtesy IWM © IWM (Art.IWM PST 8129)
DO YOU WANT A FERN-BASKET LIKE THIS? Join the Sixth AND COME AND GET ONE. Head-Quarters – St. Michael’s Hill, Bristol. Courtesy IWM © IWM (Art.IWM PST 8129)

The first name on the memorial is Rev P G Alexander who founded the Downend Scout Group in 1909.  Philip Alexander was the curate of Christchurch Downend at the start of the 20th Century and was married to the niece of legendary cricketer WG Grace. When war broke out he joined up and, in 1916, was aboard HMS Hampshire when it was sunk by a German mine near the Orkney Isles. Lord Kitchener was also on board the ship at the time and both Kitchener and Alexander lost their lives.

BBC Radio Cumbria

In the 1930s, Bramwell Evans was known to millions from his role on BBC Children’s Hour where he regaled a generation with his tales of life from a travelling family.  But prior to this, Evans was a Methodist Minister in Carlisle where he reached out to a new audience of munitions workers by holding religious services with musical entertainment in a popular cinema.

Evans and the Methodists in the city identified a need for social support for munitions workers. They looked after young women away from home; found lodgings for over 1000 men, girls and married couples who came to work in Carlisle;

Head and shoulders portrait of Kaiser Wilhelm II which was presented to Hugh, 5th Earl of Lonsdale by the Kaiser in commemoration of his visit to Lord Lonsdale's estate at Lowther Castle, Cumbria in August 1895. The portrait is signed and dated by the Kaiser.Courtesy IWM.© IWM (HU 68366)
Head and shoulders portrait of Kaiser Wilhelm II which was presented to Hugh, 5th Earl of Lonsdale by the Kaiser in commemoration of his visit to Lord Lonsdale’s estate at Lowther Castle, Cumbria in August 1895. Courtesy IWM.© IWM (HU 68366)

and established Sunday evening services in Botchergate Cinema.  These services attracted good quality singers and musicians and ran regularly at various points during 1916 and 1917, welcoming people into the cinema early on cold and wet days.

BBC Newcastle look at the vital, though secret, role that Cullercoats Coastal Radio station in North Shields, played during World War One. The station intercepted radio messages sent to and from German ships and U-boats and passed them to Admiralty Headquarters in London.  Although they were encrypted, a number of German codebooks had been seized during the war, allowing many messages to be interpreted.

First World War period badge for the Newcastle-on-Tyne Volunteer Training Corps. British Home Defence associations. Courtesy IWM  © IWM (INS 7361)
First World War period badge for the Newcastle-on-Tyne Volunteer Training Corps. British Home Defence associations. Courtesy IWM © IWM (INS 7361)

The Station had been built in 1908 when it was used by the inventor Guglielmo Marconi to send test signals to a station in Denmark.  It continued to operate as a maritime radio station after the two world wars before it was closed in 1998.

All BBC Local Radio stations across England will broadcast five World War One At Home stories from June 25th to June 29th.

All the final World War One At Home stories and many more will then be available online on a dedicated website at www.bbc.co.uk/ww1

Ends

Notes to Editors

BBC “World War One At Home” journalists have also been working with academics from universities across Britain who have been supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The AHRC funds research in the arts and humanities and helps share the findings with the wider public.

Each World War One at Home story broadcast on radio and TV over the last two years will be available to listen to online and the audience will be able to browse stories to find out how their area’s experience contrasted with those elsewhere, and discover the nationwide experience of the Home Front.

The stories will be classified by place (a BBC local area such as BBC Leeds or BBC Kent or a nation – BBC Wales, BBC Northern Ireland and BBCScotland) and by themes such as Sport, Working for the War, War in the Air.

All of the stories will be shareable via social media – #WW1AtHome

For further information contact:

Karen Williams, Publicist, BBC English Regions

karen.williams@bbc.co.uk or 0771 4957087

@BBCNorthPR

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Commemorations WW1 Engagement Centres Research Uncategorized

The Crich Stand – Memorial to the Mercian Regiment

With acknowledgment to Dr Nigel Hunt.
Dedication Service 6th August 1923. With acknowledgement to Dr Nigel Hunt

A Blog kindly submitted by Dr Nigel Hunt, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham.  Dr Hunt is a Researcher for the Centre for Hidden Histories.  The Centre is a one of five World War One Engagement centres established by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) .  Hidden Histories is a collaboration between the Universities of Nottingham, Nottingham Trent, Oxford Brookes, Manchester Metropolitan, UCL, Goldsmiths and Derby

Crich Stand, a lighthouse on top of a limestone cliff almost as far from the sea as you can get in the UK, is a memorial to the Mercian Regiment (prior to that the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, originally the Sherwood Foresters). It officially became the memorial after the First World War, but there is a story that in June 1856 the end of the Crimean War was celebrated by a crowd including a Crich-born Crimean War veteran, Sergeant Wetton of the 95th Derbyshire Regiment, was carried up to the top of the hill in a chair (he lost his leg at the Battle of the Alma).

Crich Stand and the memorial to General Smith-Dorrien Colonel of the Re...
Crich Stand and the memorial to General Smith-Dorrien. With acknowledgment to Dr Nigel Hunt.

There have been several Stands on the hill, but it wasn’t until the 1920s that the current tower was built and dedicated to the memory of the 11,409 Sherwood Foresters who had been killed in the war. The site, nearly 1,000 feet above sea level, was chosen because it is visible from large parts of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

The builder was Joseph Payne. The stone used was that of the previous tower, numbered and stored. It was quite an undertaking, with the tower reaching 64 feet, and the dome on the top weighing around 40 tons. It cost £2382, raised mainly through subscription.

Crich Stand above the quarry face
Crich Stand above the quarry face. With acknowledgment to Dr Nigel Hunt.

After the Second World War, in 1952, a service was held to dedicate the memorial to the 1,520 Sherwood Foresters who died in that war. In 1991 two plaques were added at the base of the tower dedicated to the Sherwood Foresters killed after 1945, and to the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters who died after 1970. Relatively recently, a new stone memorial has been built near the Stand with the names of those who have died in recent wars. It still has empty spaces.

Each year, on the first Sunday of July, close to the anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme, a pilgrimage and service of remembrance is held at the Stand, attended by veterans of the regiment and others. There are few memorials in more prominent and impressive positions.